DL 492 to be conserved forever!

SILT’s newest conservation property; DL 492 near Grand Forks, BC

SILT has purchased 109 hectares (270 acres) of open, rolling hills of bunchgrass interspersed with patches of trembling aspen-rose thickets located just east of Grand Forks. The property, known locally as DL 492, is year-round habitat for a herd of 200-300 California bighorn sheep. Rams and ewes of all ages use the land. It is also excellent winter and spring range for mule deer and white-tailed deer. Several species-at-risk occur, including rattlesnake, gophersnake, spadefoot toad, tiger salamander and badger.

This low-elevation grassland is significant for more reasons than its great diversity of wildlife. DL 492 lies within an ecosystem that extends only a short way into British Columbia from Washington State, forming a narrow band from Anarchist Summit east along the Kettle River to the Grand Forks basin.

Buying DL 492 for conservation was made possible by the family of the late Walter Mehmal; the BC Conservation Foundation Land for Wildlife Fund; the Brandow Family; the Wild Sheep Society of BC and its members; the Grand Forks Wildlife Association; and other donors and SILT supporters. If you believe the most rewarding investment for the future of wildlife is habitat acquisition and care, please donate to support SILT’s conservation work.

DL 492 has had a decades-long history of cattle grazing and uncontrolled trespass for off-road ATV use. This has caused some hillslope erosion and soil disturbance. To manage DL 492 for wildlife, SILT will work with its conservation partners, government, and local off-road and other interested groups to promote awareness, exclude cattle, restrict ATV use, and enhance the habitat value of the property.

SILT encourages non-mechanized public use of its lands for wildlife-related recreation and nature appreciation. We believe this rewards and engages people that support and benefit from habitat conservation, provided such use is safe, legal and protects the integrity of the land. SILT will conserve DL 492 in perpetuity, for all living things including people, and will never stray from that responsibility.

Mlharing/iStock/Thinkstock photo

Substantial donations to SILT were provided by these and other donors

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Help Protect Grand Forks Grassland!

SILT has an agreement to purchase 109 hectares (270 acres) of rare grassland habitat near Grand Forks. We need to raise $117,000 this month! Please help create another lasting legacy for wildlife. Click here to DONATE. Every dollar matters! Donations are tax deductible.

DL 492 is open, rolling hills of bunchgrass interspersed with patches of trembling aspen-rose thickets. The property is year-round habitat for a healthy herd of 200-300 California bighorn sheep. Rams and ewes of all ages use the land. It is also excellent winter and spring range for mule deer and white-tailed deer. Several species-at-risk occur, including rattlesnake, gophersnake, spadefoot toad, tiger salamander and badger.

The Grand Forks (Gilpin) sheep herd has provided decades of first-class hunting and excellent wildlife viewing opportunities. Your donation will help ensure that undeveloped, productive habitat is protected forever. SILT welcomes and encourages non-mechanized public access for wildlife- and nature-related recreation on all its conservation properties. DONATE HERE

   Email questions or comments to: office@siltrust.ca       Ram photo: Mlharing/iStock/Thinkstock      

 

 

R.E. Taylor Conservation Property

For Immediate Release

The Southern Interior Land Trust (SILT) has purchased 4.9 hectares (12 acres) of seasonally-flooded mature water birch forest, on the banks of Keremeos Creek near Olalla, between Penticton and Keremeos.

The property is a gem of intact streamside Water Birch forest, one of very few remaining in the Okanagan-Similkameen. It provides habitat for at least five federally-listed species at risk, including the Yellow-breasted Chat, Western Screech Owl and Lewis’s Woodpecker. It is also good habitat for deer, bear, bobcat and badger that travel across the valley, and for rainbow trout in the creek. 

The property will be known as the R.E. Taylor Conservation Property, in honour of Ron Taylor of Winfield, BC, whose dedication and commitment to wildlife conservation in BC has spanned more than half a century. Ron helped to create SILT over 30 years ago, served as its President for many years, and has been on the Board of Directors since the society was formed in 1988.     

SILT is a volunteer-run, not-for-profit charity dedicated to conserving land for all living things. SILT works to acquire those gems and jewels of wildlife habitat that act as “stepping-stones” for animal movement through developed areas.

SILT believes that maintaining public access to its conservation lands rewards and further engages the people that support and benefit from habitat conservation. SILT thanks everyone who donates to support SILT’s work. SILT also recognizes the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation (HCTF) and the hunters, trappers, guides and anglers that contribute to the HCTF through their licence fees, for making a significant financial contribution to the R.E. Taylor Conservation Property purchase. 

“The HCTF is very pleased to contribute to the purchase of this property to protect some very rare undisturbed valley bottom habitat in the Okanagan,” says HCTF CEO Brian Springinotic. Though the Foundation was not aware of SILT’s plan to name the property after Ron Taylor when it decided to support the project, Springinotic says it’s a fitting tribute. “Naming this property after Ron is a fantastic way to recognize his many contributions to conservation in BC, including past participation on the HCTF Board of Directors.”      

Learn more and donate to support SILT at: www.siltrust.ca. Tax receipts will be issued for donations of cash, land or bequests.

NEWS MEDIA:

Direct questions and logo requests to Al Peatt, SILT Executive Director, at: 250-328-4699; or apeatt@siltrust.ca

ONA and ORWHFS Partner on ORRI Habitat Rehabilitation

ORWHFS has partnered with The Okanagan Nation Alliance (ONA) to administer HSP funds for use in habitat rehabilitation for species at risk. The work will primarily be conducted along the Okanagan River Channel that was reclaimed through the ORRI Phase-1 project.

The work being carried out by ONA is critical to the Okanagan River ecosystem and is being funded through the Habitat Stewardship Program.