Volunteer Opportunity

The Southern Interior Land Trust is interested in welcoming new additions to its board of directors.

If you are passionate about conserving land for wildlife in the Southern Interior of B.C., consider sending some information about your interest and what you would bring to the board in an e-mail to secretary-treasurer Gord Wilson.

The board is especially interested in adding particular skill sets to the makeup of the team, so if you have a legal mind, skills in fund-raising, promotion, grant-writing, accounting, use of social media, land appraisal or real estate, ecology or biology, construction, selling or marketing or environmental restoration, SILT would like to hear from you.

You might find yourself exploring new properties to determine their importance for conservation; working on the ground on restoration projects; raising the profile of SILT, or funds to purchase properties with important natural features; or preparing grant applications to ensure another gem of wildlife habitat can be conserved in its natural state.
You’d be a volunteer, and it’s work, but it’s satisfying work.

To learn more about SILT, browse the website. If you have questions, send an e-mail to office@siltrust.ca

Edwards Pond is in Great Shape

SILT frequently inspects its properties to ensure they are in good condition and functioning as desired.  Edwards Pond is a 50 acre wetland-cottonwood complex near Grand Forks. While it is in great shape we’re concerned about periodic trespass by off-roaders and have had reports of painted turtle needing safe crossing structures as they move to and from their surrounding habitats. Buying the land is not enough! Donations help SILT to keep Edwards Pond and our other conservation properties protected and productive forever. Please donate now!

Ron Taylor Receives Parliamentary Award


SILT Director, Ron Taylor (left) was presented with a Parliamentary Award by Kelowna-Lake Country MP, Tracey Gray and Oceola Fish & Game Club President, Nick Kozub.

The Award was presented to Ron at Oceola’s 61st annual banquet, in recognition of his many contributions through volunteering in multiple not-for-profit organizations and his endless efforts towards conservation and habitat restoration throughout the province.

Congratulation Ron!

SILT-tagged bobcat makes an appearance!


This ear-tagged and radio-collared male bobcat appeared this week at a Heritage Hills residence south of Penticton. It is not the first time one of SILT’s research cats has spent time in this yard, which is in the heart of great bobcat habitat!  SILT is facilitating a Phd study by Trent University looking at how bobcat and lynx interact and use their respective habitats. SILT is interested in where these cats move through the landscape as that information could help guide future habitat management and acquisition.

This cat’s collar was set to drop off last summer so the GPS movement data it contains could be recovered but for some reason the collar has failed to come off. SILT volunteers will continue to try to live capture the cat to remove the collar. If you see it, or any other ear-tagged bobcat or lynx, please call Ross Everatt at 250-499-9840. You can also help by supporting SILT’s work -follow the links on this page to make a tax-deductible donation!

DL 492 to be conserved forever!

SILT’s newest conservation property; DL 492 near Grand Forks, BC

SILT has purchased 109 hectares (270 acres) of open, rolling hills of bunchgrass interspersed with patches of trembling aspen-rose thickets located just east of Grand Forks. The property, known locally as DL 492, is year-round habitat for a herd of 200-300 California bighorn sheep. Rams and ewes of all ages use the land. It is also excellent winter and spring range for mule deer and white-tailed deer. Several species-at-risk occur, including rattlesnake, gophersnake, spadefoot toad, tiger salamander and badger.

This low-elevation grassland is significant for more reasons than its great diversity of wildlife. DL 492 lies within an ecosystem that extends only a short way into British Columbia from Washington State, forming a narrow band from Anarchist Summit east along the Kettle River to the Grand Forks basin.

Buying DL 492 for conservation was made possible by the family of the late Walter Mehmal; the BC Conservation Foundation Land for Wildlife Fund; the Brandow Family; the Wild Sheep Society of BC and its members; the Grand Forks Wildlife Association; and other donors and SILT supporters. If you believe the most rewarding investment for the future of wildlife is habitat acquisition and care, please donate to support SILT’s conservation work.

DL 492 has had a decades-long history of cattle grazing and uncontrolled trespass for off-road ATV use. This has caused some hillslope erosion and soil disturbance. To manage DL 492 for wildlife, SILT will work with its conservation partners, government, and local off-road and other interested groups to promote awareness, exclude cattle, restrict ATV use, and enhance the habitat value of the property.

SILT encourages non-mechanized public use of its lands for wildlife-related recreation and nature appreciation. We believe this rewards and engages people that support and benefit from habitat conservation, provided such use is safe, legal and protects the integrity of the land. SILT will conserve DL 492 in perpetuity, for all living things including people, and will never stray from that responsibility.

Mlharing/iStock/Thinkstock photo

Substantial donations to SILT were provided by these and other donors

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Help Protect Grand Forks Grassland!

SILT has an agreement to purchase 109 hectares (270 acres) of rare grassland habitat near Grand Forks. We need to raise $117,000 this month! Please help create another lasting legacy for wildlife. Click here to DONATE. Every dollar matters! Donations are tax deductible.

DL 492 is open, rolling hills of bunchgrass interspersed with patches of trembling aspen-rose thickets. The property is year-round habitat for a healthy herd of 200-300 California bighorn sheep. Rams and ewes of all ages use the land. It is also excellent winter and spring range for mule deer and white-tailed deer. Several species-at-risk occur, including rattlesnake, gophersnake, spadefoot toad, tiger salamander and badger.

The Grand Forks (Gilpin) sheep herd has provided decades of first-class hunting and excellent wildlife viewing opportunities. Your donation will help ensure that undeveloped, productive habitat is protected forever. SILT welcomes and encourages non-mechanized public access for wildlife- and nature-related recreation on all its conservation properties. DONATE HERE

   Email questions or comments to: office@siltrust.ca       Ram photo: Mlharing/iStock/Thinkstock      

 

 

Conservation Property Dedicated to Lifetime Conservationist Ron Taylor

The Southern Interior Land Trust (SILT) recently added a fifth property to its conservation holdings—a gem of intact streamside water birch habitat on the banks of Keremeos Creek near Olalla.

On Saturday, September 28th, SILT dedicated it the “R.E. Taylor Conservation Property” to honour Ron Taylor of Winfield, BC, in recognition of Ron’s life-long commitment to wildlife conservation. A career teacher and avid outdoorsman, Ron has influenced and mentored hundreds of young and old hunters, fishers, trappers, biologists and conservationists. Ron, through his strong conservation ethic, has always spoken on behalf of fish and wildlife and for the wise use of wild spaces.

Ron helped to create SILT, a non-profit land trust, and has served on its Board of Directors since the society was formed in 1988. He has been an active member of the Oceola Fish and Game Club for decades and has also served on its executive and that of the BC Wildlife Federation. Ron spent years advocating for a balance of natural resource use and protection at the Okanagan-Shuswap Land and Resource Management planning table. He has also served for several years on the Board of the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation. Ron’s willingness to share his time and knowledge to so many fish and wildlife related endeavours has had positive and lasting impacts on natural resource management in BC.

Situated on flat valley bottomland, the R.E. Taylor Conservation Property provides habitat for at least six federally listed species at risk including yellow-breasted chat, western screech owl, Lewis’s woodpecker, barn owl, badger and common nighthawk. Deer, bear, moose, bobcat and other wildlife also use the property and rainbow trout and other fish live in the creek.

SILT works to keep its properties open to all types of wildlife-related recreation. SILT believes that doing so rewards the people that contribute to habitat conservation. Partial funding to purchase the R.E. Taylor Conservation Property came from the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation. SILT appreciates the hunters, trappers, guides and anglers that support the foundation through their licence fees, and SILT’s other donors that help make our habitat acquisitions possible—for all living things

RE Taylor

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Ginty’s Pond: Wetlandkeepers Course – Report

by Kasey Moran…

Event Overview

Wetlandkeepers Courses are delivered by BCWF and cover a standard set of skills related to wetland classification, plant identification, and soil analyses. For more information, see their website:

https://bcwf.bc.ca/wetlandkeepers-courses/

In addition to the standard Wetlandkeepers Course content, this event involved an in-depth community-based conversation about Ginty’s Pond. Many Cawston (and area) residents recounted memories of the pond when it would have been classified as a shallow open-water wetland, rather than the cattail marsh that exists today. Some community members expressed a concern for the pond’s current appearance, and expressed a desire to restore it to its former state to facilitate recreational uses like ice skating and boating. SILT’s executive director, Al Peatt, expressed his understanding that a 7:3 ratio of open water to emergent vegetation would optimize habitat value for wildlife.

Read the Full Report Here

Vulcan Consulting Supports SILT Mandate

Peter Nazaroff

Pictured above is Peter Nazaroff from Vulcan Consulting presenting a cheque for $2,000 to SILT President, Ross Everatt.

Mr. Nazaroff wanted to support SILT’s efforts to protect and secure conservation lands and also appreciated the fact that SILT’s Board of Directors are 100% volunteer.

Ginty’s Pond Gets New Sign

Volunteer President Ross Everatt has installed a replacement sign at SILT’s Ginty’s Pond at Cawston. The pond is valuable habitat for waterfowl, songbirds, painted turtle and other wildlife. The pond  has also been a community gathering place, such as for ice-skating parties in winter. Ginty Cawston was a son of a local pioneer and owned the property; his family wanted the pond preserved in honour of Ginty’s love of nature and community. SILT acquired the property in 1991.

Last week, the BC Wildlife Federation Wetlands Team hosted a 2-day Wetlandkeepers community workshop focussed on Ginty’s Pond. SILT appreciates the support and interest of the community in keeping the pond productive and enjoyable — for all living things!